What does it mean “I through the law died to the law that I might live unto God”?






What Does It Mean “I Through The Law Died To The Law That I Might Live Unto God”

The phrase “I through the law died to the law that I might live unto God” is taken from Galatians 2:19-21 in the Bible. It means that through experiences with defeat and failure under the law, a person eventually loses capacity to come to it in the self deceived attempt to keep it. We learn in the “laboratory of our own experience” that God was right, nothing good dwells in the flesh. We learn to agree with God’s judgment on the flesh, which is that He crucified it with Christ and put it to death. Not only did He bring an end to it in the Last Adam through His death, but He demonstrated that He does not expect anything from the flesh. This is offensive to the legalist but to the person who has really learned the lesson of the “Schoolmaster” this acknowledgment is a “sigh of relief!” This death is necessary so that they can be free to live unto God in the Person of Jesus Christ (Rom 7:1-4.) All the law’s accusations have been dealt with by the work of JEsus Christ on the cross. Not only were we forgiven in Christ, we were transferred out of the realm where the Law has any demnads to make. We are now in Christ, and the law hsa nothing to say to Him, for He is the reality, and the Law is merely His shadow. Now we understand that we are to live, not by seeking to have our own righteousness out of the law, but to be found in Christ and have the righotuesness which comes from God and is based on faith. We say, “Amen! I’m crucified with Christ. I died to sin, I died to the law, and I’m raised up with Christ! I look to Him to be my life!”

The phrase “I through the law died to the law that I might live unto God” is taken from Galatians 2:19-21 in the Bible. It means that through experiences of defeat and failure under the law, a person eventually loses the capacity to approach it in the self-deceived attempt to keep it. We learn in the “laboratory of our own experience” that God was right—nothing good dwells in the flesh (Romans 7:18). We learn to agree with God’s judgment on the flesh, which is that He crucified it with Christ and put it to death (Galatians 5:24). Not only did He bring an end to it in the Last Adam through His death, but He demonstrated that He does not expect anything from the flesh. This is offensive to the legalist, but to the person who has truly learned the lesson of the “schoolmaster,” this acknowledgment is a “sigh of relief!” (Galatians 3:24-25). This death is necessary so that they can be free to live unto God in the person of Jesus Christ (Romans 7:1-4). All the law’s accusations have been dealt with by the work of Jesus Christ on the cross. Not only were we forgiven in Christ, but we were also transferred out of the realm where the law has any demands to make. We are now in Christ, and the law has nothing to say to Him, for He is the reality, and the law is merely His shadow (Colossians 2:16-17). Now we understand that we are to live, not by seeking to have our own righteousness out of the law, but by being found in Christ and having the righteousness that comes from God and is based on faith (Philippians 3:9). We say, “Amen! I’m crucified with Christ. I died to sin, I died to the law, and I’m raised up with Christ! I look to Him to be my life!” (Galatians 2:20; Romans 6:6-11).

This is a profound shift from trying in our flesh to be righteous to recognizing that our flesh has to be crucified. It has been condemned to death. Yes, we are forgiven, but our flesh, the old man, has been condemned. It had to be put off at the cross of Christ (Colossians 3:9; Romans 6:6).

This is a deep turn from trying in our flesh to be righteous to seeing that our flesh has to be crucified. It has been condemned to death. Yes, we are forgiven, but our flesh, the old man, has been condemned. It had to be put off at the cross of Christ.

Main point: Through the law, one dies to the law to live for

Matt 16:24 KJV, Gal 2:20 KJV

Implications of the phrase

A. This is a deep turn from trying in our flesh to be righteous to seeing that our flesh has to be crucified (Galatians 2:20).

B. Our flesh, the old man, has been condemned to death (Galatians 2:19).

C. We are forgiven, but our flesh had to be put off at the cross of Christ (Galatians 2:20).

Keywords: Galatians, law, freedom, grace, Christian life, cross of Christ






I. Introduction

The phrase “I through the law died to the law that I might live unto God” is from Galatians 2:19-21 in the Bible. (Galatians 2:19-21)

II. Explanation of the phrase

A. Through the law, a person dies to the law. (Galatians 2:19)

B. This death is necessary so that they can be free to live for God. (Galatians 2:19)

C. Trying to keep the law through one’s own strength and effort will only lead to failure. (Galatians 2:19)

D. By recognizing that our old selves have died with Christ and we are now living by faith in Him, we can live in the power of the Spirit and produce fruit unto God. (Galatians 2:20)

E. This is a deep turn from trying in our flesh to be righteous to seeing that our flesh has to be crucified. (Galatians 2:20)

F. Our flesh, the old man, has been condemned to death. (Galatians 2:20)

G. It had to be put off at the cross of Christ. (Galatians 2:20)

III. Conclusion

A. The phrase “I through the law died to the law that I might live unto God” teaches us that we cannot be righteous through our own efforts, but only through faith in Christ. (Galatians 2:21)


       

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